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TechWatch: “Smart nappy” helps parent’s spot early infections

by Simon Lazarus
16 July, 2013
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Simon is a published journalist in the UK, US and Europe on a range of topics and currently has a number of clients in different sectors for whom he produces content on a weekly basis. Topics include travel, property, food, lifestyle, finance, hi-tech and business.

Smart Nappy

TechWatch

It may just be child’s play, but parents may be able to sleep better at night thanks to the latest tech inspired innovation.

The brand new smart nappy, as it is being hailed, uses up to the minute QR codes in order to identify if your toddler is suffering from any bladder type ailments.

Smart nappy

This new invention was the brainchild of an American couple that uses primarily a system that is entirely colour coded. Invented by Jennie Rubinshteyn and Yaroslav Faybishenko, their breakthrough moment came after they returned to their New York abode when their daughter started to cry.

So what’s so smart about this diaper? Thanks to strips which are located in the absorbent area of the product, you can find out what’s wrong as they change colour through this particular QR code.

QR code

After this stage, an app on your hand held device will simply take an image in order to find from the absorbent panels whether or not your child has an infection.

However, there are some who have thrown their rattle out the pram especially those in the parenting arena. They believe the new concept will not alleviate parent’s worries but could enhance them.

This item comes as a response to recent statistics which reveal around 9% of babies are suffering from Urinary Tract Infections (UTI’s). They are most common in females and can be difficult to spot until the main symptoms develop including a high fever and increased signs of irritability.

It is expected that parents will have to use the smart nappy on a regular basis to build up a profile as well as a bulk of data. You can find the app across both the Apple Store and Android market place.

Available on Apple and Android

In addition, it has the ability to possibly be sent to doctors who may be able to pick up on a host of early diagnoses such as kidney dysfunction or dehydration. According to the leading UK matriarchal website Netmums, it could disparage new mothers from using their noggin.

Netmums

Founder Siobhan Freegard said; “Although at first glance it may seem like a clever idea, in reality it will probably leave sleep-deprived parents even more stressed and paranoid about their baby’s health. As with any medical device which relies on users interpreting a coloured strip, there is room for error.”

Further figures show that annually over 350 million nappies are changed with no data collected on the samples inside. Yet it is believed this unique nappy may cost up to 33% more than a normal throw away nappy.

There is still some way to go before their launch to market as the couple still need to put the medical miracle through a host of rigorous medical tests.

Time is definitely not on their side as their company PixieScientific has less than two months to raise funds of more than $200,000 via the popular crowdfunding site IndieGogo. Meanwhile, there is also stiff competition from major players in the nappy world including Huggies.

TweetPee

Just two months ago, they introduced their own nifty device entitled the TweetPee. This particular sensory device identifies any moisture and can easily hook onto a diaper. A message is then relayed to inform parents when to change their bundles of joy.

You’re in for some real fun with this one!

Simon Lazarus | Website

Simon is a published journalist in the UK, US and Europe on a range of topics and currently has a number of clients in different sectors for whom he produces content on a weekly basis. Topics include travel, property, food, lifestyle, finance, hi-tech and business.

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