The watch magazine for pocketwatches, antique watches, vintage watches and modern watches

Never mind what’s in your wallet, what’s on your wrist?

by Michael Weare
18 December, 2010
Join the discussion | Discuss this article

About the author

Michael Weare has been a professional writer for 30 years, writing about Japanese technology, German and Italian cars, British tailoring and Swiss watches. Michael manages the editorial content of Click Tempus and will be keeping the magazine fresh and informative with regular features, as well as bringing great writers to the magazine. Email: michael@clicktempus.com

whats-on-your-wrist1

If you’re one of those eager young chaps assiduously scaling the corporate ladder, what you wear on your wrist matters. Whether you like it or not your watch reflects your taste, your status, and of course, your budget.

A lot of guys faced with this situation go the tried and tested Rolex route, automatically assuming that anything with the word Rolex on it will buy them the instant respect and savoir faire they crave. This is a mistake. Not only is Rolex replicated to death, it also shows a glaring lack of imagination.

To cut a dash, make a difference and raise an eyebrow, you’ve got to become a little more imaginative. Reality also dictates that as you are on the way up, you simply can’t afford the silly money required for limited edition Swiss watches. That having been said, rather like exercise, when it comes to buying a decent brand name it’s a case of no pain, and you’re not in the game. These watches are priced to be aspirational.

There are two strategies you can adopt. The first is to opt for a fresh off the shelf quality name watch, which tells the world you’re liquid, the second is to go for something top end and vintage and pretend it’s been handed down. That says your ancestors had both money and good taste. Most importantly, once you are wearing a decent watch, perfect the art of your cuff riding up just sufficiently for people to notice it – but once it is remarked upon, always be dismissive of its undoubted allure. For a new watch: “Well it does the job.” and for a vintage watch; “This? Oh yes, been in the family for years.” uttered casually should do the trick.

Here we have selected four watches that will gain instant kudos, shock, awe, and not a little envy of your horological hauteur.

New watches

Linde Werdelin 3-Timer

Linde Werdelin is a Danish watch company. Morten Linde, the watch designer has designed numerous iconic objects from the Copenhagen public park chairs to audio systems; winning many industry-leading prizes and awards throughout his career.

The 3-Timer not only looks good, but, with the additional GMT hand and a bi-directional 24-hour bezel, the 3-Timer shows three different time zones, and comes with a mesmerising sun ray textured dial. It’s available in Steel Gold, Steel Brown, Steel Black, and Steel Silver versions so you can choose your metal to suit your budget.

Prices start at around $5000.

Jaeger Le Coultre Master Compressor World Time Chronograph

jaeger le coultre master compressor chronograph

JLC is a perfectly respectable Swiss watch brand to wear on your wrist, and is much more acceptable among watch snobs than a Rolex can ever hope to be. This handsome World Chronograph has a mechanical movement, is automatic winding, comes with a calibre JLC 752 movement, has a 72 hour power reserve and is water resistant to 100 metres. You can probably pick up a stainless steel edition for about US$10.000.

Vintage watches

Omega Gents Vintage Watch

Ask the good people at Tempus Suisse to source you a watch like this. This beautiful Omega is around US$2500!

A vintage Omega on your wrist is perfectly acceptable as it is one of the best known of the Swiss watch brands with a first class heritage and good quality through and through.

New/Old Stock 1950’s 18k Gold Vacheron Constantin

We kept the best till last.

One glance at this watch and your status is assured.

Vacheron Constantin is among the most revered and most established of all Swiss watch brands.

t is extremely rare to find a New Old Stock Vacheron from the early 1950s. For the uninitiated, New Old Stock means never sold, never worn, and stored for its lifetime. Dating from the 1950s, this watch is in near-mint all-original condition – a collectors dream and a watch snobs delight, available from Tempus Suisse at US$13,200.

So there you have it, all the thinking has been laid on, all you have to do now is reach for your credit card and start scaling the dizzy heights.

Michael Weare | Website

Michael Weare has been a professional writer for 30 years, writing about Japanese technology, German and Italian cars, British tailoring and Swiss watches. Michael manages the editorial content of Click Tempus and will be keeping the magazine fresh and informative with regular features, as well as bringing great writers to the magazine. Email: michael@clicktempus.com

Discuss: Never mind what’s in your wallet, what’s on your wrist?

0 Comment You can be the first one to leave a message


Add your comment